The planetary correspondence for the walnut tree is the sun, which makes its element fire. Pendulums from the tree have this fiery, masculine energy, believed to have magical associations with fertility and high energy.  The tree was also sacred to Astarte, the Semitic goddess of war, sexuality and fertility. The Greeks later came to associate her with Aphrodite who is most commonly known as a goddess of love and beauty.

It once was called the tree of evil since witches in Italy are said to have danced under walnut trees during their rituals. Modern Pagans and witches may not carry on this specific tradition, but its use in magic is still prevalent. Specifically, carrying the nut in the shell is believed to promote fertility of mind and body.

The walnut tree is also helpful in making a transition from one state of affairs to another including major changes in life circumstances. It has the ability to break the link of past unwanted associations. Meditation on the energy of the walnut tree helps to bring clarity and strength to make the needed change.

 

In Tibetan culture the phurba is also called 'the magic dagger'. 'Phur' is translated from the Sanskrit 'kila' and it means peg or nail.

The phurba is a stake that is used in Buddhist rituals. Because Tibet has always been a nomadic culture, the tent is an important part of Tibetan lives, and placing the tent pegs into the ground is always seen as sacrificing the ground. The shape of the phurpa may have come from the stake used to hold down tents.

The style of the phurba comes from an ancient vedic tool used to pin down sacrifices.   The Phurba has the power to transform negative energies. These energies are known as the 'three poisons,' and are attachment, ignorance, and aversion. The sides of the phurba also represent the three spirit worlds, and the phurba itself represents the axis of the three spirit worlds. The phurba brings the three spirit worlds together. The handle of the phurba represents 'wisdom', while the blade represents 'method'.

The phurba is often stabbed down into a bowl of rice or other grains in Tibetan rituals. Phurbas can be made from wood, bone, or metals such as copper and brass.

The Phurba symbolizes stability, and it is often used during ceremonies. The Phurba is often used by Tantric practitioners. The phurba can also hold demons in place. Only those who are empowered to use the Phurba may use it in these rituals. The Phurba can be used to tether negative energies during ceremonies, or as a stabilizer. The blade on a phurba is never sharp, it is only used as a ritual dagger, not an actual weapon.

The Phurba is also used by Dorje Phurba a.k.a. Vajrakilaya, who is the wrathful form of Vajrapani (who is one of the wrathful deities). Vajrakilaya is often seen holding the phurba on Buddhist statues and thangkas (Buddhist paintings). Vajrakilaya is a wrathful deity who removes obstacles. Vajrakilaya's consort is Khorlo Gyedunma, and she is a manifestation of the Green Tara.

 

This pendulum radiates  Green Energy as seen in Pendulum Alchemy (more information at Www.Pendulumalchemy.com)

This spectrum of energy is a vitalizing one that makes it very useful in clearing of energies and sending healing energy over multiple timelines in the remote past and all around the world no matter the distance that helps bring in a sense of peace, wellness, and balance to the present.

This is a truly unique pendulum that is very powerful and will deliver results when used properly.

 

Weight: 42 Grams

Length: 5 inches

Width : 1.5 inches

Walnut Wood Phurba

$40.00Price